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Mach and Matchmaker

Mach and Matchmaker: kernel and language support for object-oriented distributed systems

About this paper

Mach and Matchmaker: kernel and language support for object-oriented distributed systems , Michael B. Jones and Richard F. Rashid, from the proceedings of OOPSLA ‘86.

Notes

Yes, 1986 was a long time ago, but the topics of Mach and Matchmaker are still relevant, and I find it interesting to read about its genesis and development. I also find that it helps me put today’s uses - or abandonments - in context.

Mach

Two main families of operating systems under development today are still based on the CMU Mach project. Let’s get discussing the HURD out of the way, first. The HURD is based on GNU Mach, which is itself based on the University of Utah’s Mach 4.0 project. GNU Mach is a microkernel, so almost all of the operating system facilities are provided by user-space processes. An interesting implication is that a regular user can create a sub-HURD, an environment with a whole UNIX-like system running within their user account on the host HURD.

Not many people do that, though. HURD is very interesting to read and use, but didn’t fulfil its goal of becoming a free host for the GNU system that made it easy to support hardware. Linux came along, as a free host for the GNU system that made it worthwhile to support hardware. I enjoy using the HURD, but we’ll leave it here.

…because we need to talk about the other operating system family that uses Mach, macOS/iOS/watchOS/tvOS/whatever the thing that runs the touchbar on a Macbook Pro is called OS. These are based on CMU Mach 2.5, for the most part, which is a monolithic kernel. Broadly speaking, Mach was developed by adding bits to the 4.2 (then 4.3) BSD kernel, until it became possible to remove all of the BSD bits and still have a working BSD-like system. Mach 2.5 represents the end of the “add Mach bits to a BSD kernel” part of the process.

Based on an earlier networked environment called Accent, Mach has an object-oriented facility in which object references are called “ports”, and you send them messages by…um, sending them messages. But sending them messages is really hard, because you have to get all the bits of all the parameters in the right place. What you need is…

Matchmaker

Originally built for Accent, Matchmaker is an Interface Definition Language in which you describe the messages you want a client and server to use, and it generates procedures for sending the messages and receiving the responses in the client, and receiving the messages and sending the responses in the server.

Being built atop Mach, Matchmaker turns those messages into Mach messages sent between Mach ports. What Mach does to get the messages around is transparent, so it might take a message on one computer and deliver it to a server on a different computer, maybe even running a different architecture.

That transparency was a goal of a lot of object-oriented remote procedure call systems in the 1990s, and by and large fell flat. The reason is Peter Deutsch’s Eight Fallacies of Distributed Computing. Basically you usually want to know when your message is going out over a network, because that changes everything from how likely it is to be received, how likely you are to get a response, to how expensive it will be to send the message.

Matchmaker supported C, Common LISP, Ada, and PERQ Pascal; Accent and Mach messages, and a bunch of different computer architectures. Unfortunately it supported them all through specific knowledge of each, and the paper described here acknowledges how difficult that makes it to work on and proposes future work to clean it up. It’s not clear that future work was ever done; modern Machs all use MIG, an “interim subset” of Matchmaker that only supports C.

Object-oriented design

In my book OOP the Easy Way, I explore the idea that objects are supposed to be small, independent computer programs that communicate over the loosely-coupled channel that is message-sending. Mach and Matchmaker together implement this design. Your objects can be in different languages, on different computers, even in different host operating systems (there were Mach IPC implementations for Mach, obviously, but also VAX Unix and non-Mach BSD). As long as they understand the same format for messages, they can speak to each other.

Consider a Cocoa application. It may be written in Swift or Objective-C or Objective-C++ or Python or whatever. It has a reference to a window, where it draws its views. The app sees that window as an Objective-C object, but the app doesn’t have a connection to the framebuffer to draw windows.

The Window Server has that connection. So when you create a window in your Cocoa application, you actually send a message to the window server and get back a port that represents your window. Messages sent to the window are forwarded to the window server, and events that happen in the UI (like the window being closed or resized) are sent as messages to the application.

Because of the way that Mach can transparently forward messages, it’s theoretically possible for an application on one computer to display its UI on another computer’s window server. In fact, that’s more than a theoretical possibility. NeXTSTEP supported exactly that capability, and an application with the NXHost default set could draw to a window server on a different computer, even one with a different CPU architecture.

This idea of loosely-coupled objects keeps coming up, but particular implementations rarely stay around for long. Mach messages still exist on HURD and Apple’s stuff (both using MIG, rather than Matchmaker), but HURD is tiny and Apple recommend against using Mach or MIG directly, favouring other interfaces like XPC or the traditional UNIX IPC systems that are implemented atop Mach. Similarly, PDO has come and gone, as have CORBA and its descendents DSOM and DOE.

Even within the world of “let’s use HTTP for everything”, SOAP gave way to REST, which gave way to the limited thing you get if you do the CRUD bits of REST without doing the DAP bits. What you learn by understanding Mach and its interfaces is that this scheme can be applied everywhere from an internet service down to an operating system component.